Your Health Matters - July 2017


 

 

In this Issue

--Good'n'Healthy: Try Homemade BBQ Sauce!

--Everyday Health: Overheating and Sunstroke

--Matter of Fact: Smoking Can Affect Your Vision

--Health Awareness: Hepatitits C

--Events: Check out our Mobile Farmer's Market!!
 



Homemade BBQ Sauce! 

Summer's here; have a BBQ! Try this delicious mouth-watering recipe.

Ingredients:
1 cup of ketchup
1 cup tomato sauce
⅔ cup brown sugar
⅔ cup apple cider vinegar
¼ cup molasses
2 teaspoons of liquid smoke
¼ teaspoon of chili powder
½ teaspoon of pimentón (smoked Spanish paprika)
¼ teaspoon of cinnamon
½ teaspoon of black pepper
1 teaspoon of ground cumin

Combine all ingredients in a large saucepan.
Simmer for 20 minutes.
Refrigerate.

 

Be aware of overheating and sunstroke!
I’m already sweating, this summer has been hot!

Watch out for heat-related illnesses that could be stressful to you and your loved-one's health. The most common heat-related illnesses are heat stroke, heat exhaustion, heat cramps, sunburn, and heat rash.

Heat Stroke

What to look for: 
  • Pay attention to your body temperature;
  • Red, hot and damp skin;
  • Fast pulse;
  • Headaches and nausea;
  • Passing out.
What to do: 
  • This is an emergency, CALL 911;
  • Move to a cooler area;
  • Use cool clothes or a cool bath to lower the person’s body temperature;
  • DON’T DRINK ANYTHING.
     

Heat Cramps

What to look for: 
  • Muscle pains and abnormal contractions;
  • Excessive sweating during extreme exercise.
What to do: 
  • Stop all physical activity;
  • Move to a cool place and drink lots of water;
  • Wait for cramps to stop before doing more physical activities;
  • Get help immediately if your cramps last longer than an hour, if you have heart problems, or you’re on a low-sodium diet.
     

Sunburn

What to look for: 
  • Throbbing, red and warm skin;
  • Bubble-like blisters on the skin.
What to do:
  • Stay away from the sun until your burn heals;
  • Take a cool bath;
  • Use moisturizing lotion;
  • Don’t pop those blisters!

Read more!


Heat Exhaustion

What to look for:
  • Sweating;
  • Clammy skin;
  • Abnormal pulse;
  • Nausea or vomiting;
  • Muscle aches;
  • Feeling lethargic and weak;
  • Headaches;
  • Passing out.
What to do:
  • Move to a cooler area;
  • Take a cool bath;
  • Drink cold water;
  • Get help immediately if you are vomiting, or experiencing worse symptoms that last longer than an hour.
     

Heat rash

What to look for:
  • Small, red blisters that appear on the neck, chest, groin, or elbow creases that form in clusters.
What to do:
  • Move to a cool place;
  • Keep your rash dry;
  • Apply baby powder.
     


Smoking can affect your eye-sight

Cigarettes contain chemicals that can damage your eyes, causing vision loss or blindness. If you smoke, there’s a good chance that you may develop vision problems. The two main dangers are age-related Macular Degeneration (AMD) and Cataracts.

Macular Degeneration (AMD) is a disease that causes rapid vision loss. If you have AMD, your central vision is directly affected. This makes it hard to see objects clearly and do everyday activities, such as reading, recognizing faces, and driving.

Cataracts lead to serious vision loss that worsens over time. This disease impairs the lens on your eyes, which can only treated with eyeglasses or surgery.

If you smoke, your chances of developing AMD are twice as likely, compared to a nonsmoker. You are also two to three times more likely to get cataracts. Stop smoking and save your vision! Learn More.

 

Hepatitis C

 

Hepatitis C is a liver infection caused by the Hepatitis C virus. The virus is common--millions of Americans have it. If you think you have Hep C, be sure to talk to your primary care provider. Learn More.

 

 

 


 

 

 

Mobile Farmer's Market

Get fresh veggies--Every Tuesday in July from 1:00 - 2:00 PM  at the Chase St. entrance at our Mt. Vernon Center. Learn More.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

LGBT Interpersonal Violence Survivor's Group

Build effective pathways to healing, regaining strength, and connecting with other LGBTQ survivors in a safe space. Learn More.